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What Factors Are Considered When Selecting Dental Material for Implants?

What Factors Are Considered When Selecting Dental Material for Implants?

The purpose of modern dentistry is to assist patients in restoring their natural oral health through the use of various dental materials and practices. An excellent example of this is the use of specific dental material for implants. For optimal performance, the implant biomaterials must be carefully selected to ensure long-term satisfaction. Over the past decade, numerous advances have been made which has made it easier to protect the biocompatibility profiles of substances used to replace or augment with biologic tissue. Professionals will consider several critical factors when selecting the appropriate dental material for individual patients.

What is a Biomaterial?

A common question patients have is what a biomaterial is. File materials are defined as any material which is compatible with living tissue. The goal of biomaterials research is to continually develop better implant materials which lead to predictable, control guided, and rapid healing for the patient.

Chemical and Biological Factors

One selecting the appropriate biomaterials for a dental implant there are both chemical and biological factors to consider. In general, dental material falls into four basic categories: metals/metallic alloys, ceramics, synthetic polymers, and natural materials. Metals/metallic alloys are often preferred because of the overall strength of their properties. Bioinert materials allow close approximation of bone on their surface. This allows for the formation of new bone and ion exchange with tissues to create a chemical bond along the surface. Biotolerant dental material is any material which is not necessarily rejected when implanted into living tissue.

Corrosion

The most common chemical factor considered one selecting dental material for implants is the effect of corrosion. There are several different types of corrosion which can occur with a dental implant. The first is general corrosion which occurs when a metal is immersed in an electrolyte solution. The second is pitting corrosion which occurs in an implant with a small surface pit placed in a solution. This type of corrosion can proceed very rapidly and actively attack the implant if proper surface conditions do not exist. The final consideration is crevice corrosion which occurs around the bone implant interface creates an environment with minimal space and little or no oxygen. When metallic ions dissolve they can create a positively charged local environment in the crevice which leads to corrosion.

Response of Patient to Dental Material

The second consideration when choosing dental material for an implant is the response of the patient’s body. Everyone heals at different rates and is tolerant to different types of dental materials. On a cellular level, the patient’s response to implants involves a series of silent matrix of an. The end result of these events is tissue healing which leads to the fusion of bone to the biomaterial used to anchor the implant.

Mechanical Properties of Dental Materials

The final consideration when selecting the appropriate dental material for an implant is the mechanical properties associated with it. These properties include tensile strength, compressive strength, metallurgy, and elongation. All of these properties will directly affect the long-term durability of the implant. The human mouth has the ability to generate tremendous pressure during use which is why the mechanical properties of a dental material will play a critical role in determining when or if it will need to be replaced.

My name is Mable Hall, a professional freelance writer, like to introduce Biogenesis Co Ltd . The purpose of modern dentistry is to assist patients in restoring their natural oral health through the use of various Dental Material and practices.


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